Kids be trippin’ (and stumbling)
May14

Kids be trippin’ (and stumbling)

Worried that your toddler is limping, has a neurologic problem, or worse, is just clumsy?  Toddlers walk with an awkward, unsteady gait because the angle between their thigh and foot has not yet established their normal set point. Kids need to spend a few years growing while bearing weight on their legs for the legs to straighten out correctly. Towards the end of pregnancy when their living situation gets a bit crowded, babies’ thighs...

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What’s the deal with baby drool?
Apr15

What’s the deal with baby drool?

Hint: It’s not caused by teething. Drooling is not a sign of teething. It signals that your baby’s salivary glands started working. Teething starts after 4 months (typically around 6 months) but a baby’s mouth fountain begins around 3 months. Some kids drool a little, and some a lot. And the only thing to worry about is the chin rash that will appear if your baby is an enthusiastic drooler. Babies don’t actually make much saliva until...

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Too early to start team sports?
Apr07

Too early to start team sports?

Four-year-olds running amuck on the soccer field are adorable, but what is your child learning from team sports at this age? Pick the right time to start sports and you’ll boost their confidence and develop skills. Starting kids in sports before they are developmentally ready can lead to frustration and quitting. One out of three kids in organized sports drops out every year. Proven benefits of team sport participation include finding...

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See the World through Baby-Colored Glasses
Mar11

See the World through Baby-Colored Glasses

What can a baby see? How can you help your little one’s visual development? Babies are born with eyeballs and a visual processing center in the brain, but their ability to see is not yet fully developed. It isn’t just that babies are near-sighted, with vision around 20/200. Their eyeballs are surprisingly light-insensitive. A one month-old baby needs fifty times more illumination to detect the presence of light than adults, because...

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Ready for responsibility
Mar04

Ready for responsibility

How do you know your child is ready for a sleepover, to get a pet or stay home alone? If your child asks for a new responsibility, it’s a good sign he may be ready. Here’s how you can prepare for the big leap: Step 1: What skills are needed? If you are considering leaving your child home alone, can they dial 911? Do they know your house rules? Step 2: Identify tasks that are mini-versions of the new responsibility. If your son...

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